Nov
18
2020

Join us to learn about the importance of effective speaking skills for scientists. Carole will go over the traits of a successful speaker, body language signals to avoid, common mistakes, planning a presentation, designing the presentation, the need for “practice, practice, practice” and how to answer questions.
Sept. 21 – Effective Presentations | Seattle AWIS
Carole Scandella, MS, CCC-SLP is a speech language pathologist, working mostly in the public school setting. For the past several years she has been the Manager of the SLP Department for the Edmonds School District. She has worked with students in grades K-12 who have speech and language disorders.
*as space is limited you are only guaranteed your space if you log-in using the provided zoom link 5 minutes prior to the start of the event. Zoom links will be shared to all registered persons at 9am Pacific on the day of the event.*

6:00PM - 7:00PM PST at

Virtual – Zoom

Dec
16
2020

Join Seattle AWIS and speaker Susan Prichard as we discuss the Precision Forestry Cooperative

Dr. Susan J. Prichard is a research scientist at the UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS) and studies fire ecology, landscape vegetation and fire dynamics, and fire and fuels management. Their main interests are in the effects of fire and other disturbances on forest dynamics, climatic change on forest ecosystems, and fuel treatment options to mitigate wildfire effects.

Registration available soon!

6pm - 8pm Pacific at

Virtual – Zoom

Jan
20
2021

Join  Seattle AWIS and Kim Parsons, PhD, to learn more about her work orca pod genetics.

STEAM Cafe: Dr. Kim Parsons — Lake Washington Girls Middle School

Kim Parsons, PhD is a Research Geneticist at Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries. Kim has expertise in developing and applying molecular genetic tools to address ecological questions in the study of marine mammal conservation and management. Her work spans multiple groups including collaborative studies with governmental agencies, non-profit and NGOs globally. Kims work addresses questions of both local and international relevance, contributing to our understanding of the evolutionary history and current status of cetacean populations, and helping to mitigate human impacts.

6pm - 8pm Pacific at

Virtual – Zoom

Feb
17
2021

Seattle AWIS is excited to host Tammi van Neel and Tianzi Zhang, as they share insights into their work exploring the Chemical Mechanisms that Underlie Disease.

Tammi  received a B.S. in Chemistry from Florida State University in 2017. While at FSU she participated in research focused on glucagon immunoassays using capillary electrophoresis with Dr. Michael Roper. Here at UW, she focuses on developing technologies capable of sequestering small molecule signals in complex microenvironments.

Tianzi received a BA in Chemistry from Cornell College in 2015. While at Cornell College, she did research in studying organic synthesis for solvatochromic dyes (solutes that change colors when dissolved in solvents with different polarities). She also interned in the Quality Control Lab at Integrated DNA Technologies. She is currently working on developing microfluidic devices to understand cell signaling mechanisms in human kidney pathology and pulmonary fibrosis.

Registration available soon

6pm - 8pm Pacific at

Virtual – Zoom

Chemical Mechanisms Underlying Disease

Seattle AWIS is excited to host Tammi van Neel and Tianzi Zhang, as they share insights into their work exploring the Chemical Mechanisms that Underlie Disease.

Tammi  received a B.S. in Chemistry from Florida State University in 2017. While at FSU she participated in research focused on glucagon immunoassays using capillary electrophoresis with Dr. Michael Roper. Here at UW, she focuses on developing technologies capable of sequestering small molecule signals in complex microenvironments.

Tianzi received a BA in Chemistry from Cornell College in 2015. While at Cornell College, she did research in studying organic synthesis for solvatochromic dyes (solutes that change colors when dissolved in solvents with different polarities). She also interned in the Quality Control Lab at Integrated DNA Technologies. She is currently working on developing microfluidic devices to understand cell signaling mechanisms in human kidney pathology and pulmonary fibrosis.

Registration available soon